Witchcraft and Belief in Early Modern Scotland (Palgrave Historical Studies in Witchcraft and Magic)

Cover of: Witchcraft and Belief in Early Modern Scotland (Palgrave Historical Studies in Witchcraft and Magic) |

Published by Palgrave Macmillan .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • British & Irish history: c 1500 to c 1700,
  • Occultism & quasi-religious beliefs,
  • Social History,
  • c 1500 to c 1600,
  • c 1600 to c 1700,
  • History,
  • History - General History,
  • History: World,
  • Europe - Great Britain - General,
  • Magick Studies,
  • History / Social History,
  • Scotland,
  • Witchcraft

Edition Notes

Book details

ContributionsJulian Goodare (Editor), Lauren Martin (Editor), Joyce Miller (Editor)
The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages256
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL10194319M
ISBN 100230507883
ISBN 109780230507883

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Review 'This is an excellent collection of academic essays on various aspects of early modern Scottish witchcraft Highly recommended as a serious research book for anyone who is interested in historical witch beliefs and practices in Scotland.'5/5(1).

This book is a collection of essays on Scottish witchcraft. Unlike most such works, it concentrates on witchcraft beliefs rather than witch-hunting. It ranges widely across areas of popular belief, culture, and ritual practice, as well as dealing with intellectual life and incorporating regional and comparative elements/5(11).

About this book This pioneering collection concentrates on witchcraft beliefs rather than witch-hunting. It ranges widely across areas of popular belief, culture and ritual practice, as well as dealing with intellectual life and incorporating regional and comparative elements.

A brilliant book if you are looking into Witchcraft in Early Modern Scotland. It is not a easy read by any means. But it offers clear examples that are explained well.

Would recommend to anyone who is studying this period of by: 9. Get this from a library. Witchcraft and belief in early modern Scotland. [Julian Goodare; Lauren Martin; Joyce Miller;] -- "Witchcraft has almost always had an important place in people's belief systems, helping them to organise and understand their ideas about community and neighbourliness, good and evil, harm and.

This pioneering collection concentrates on witchcraft beliefs rather than witch-hunting. It ranges widely across areas of popular belief, culture and ritual practice, as well as dealing with intellectual life and incorporating regional and comparative elements.

Full introductory sections and supporting notes provide information about the contexts needed to understand the texts: court politics, social history and culture, religious changes, law and the workings of the court, and the history of witchcraft prosecutions in Scotland before The book also brings to bear on this material current.

These ideas took different shape and form over time and place. In early modern Europe these beliefs became matters of life or death. What were the beliefs behind the witchcraft prosecutions of early modern Scotland.

What was their wider import in Scottish society and culture. The book is a collection of essays on Scottish witchcraft by:   The book is a collection of essays on Scottish witchcraft belief.

It ranges widely across areas of popular belief, culture and ritual practice, as well as dealing with intellectual life and incorporating regional and comparative elements.5/5(1).

Witchcraft in Early Modern Scotland will be immensely useful for scholars of witchcraft, demonology, early modern women, as well as those who study Scottish political, religious, legal, and social history.

The Scottish Historical Review / List of Issues / Vol Issue 2 / Witchcraft and Belief in Early Modern Scotland. Edited by Julian Goodare, Lauren Martin and Joyce Miller. xiii, ISBN: Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, £Author: Ronald E Hutton. The book is a collection of essays on Scottish witchcraft belief.

It ranges widely across areas of popular belief, culture and ritual practice, as well as dealing with intellectual life and incorporating regional and comparative elements.

Buy Witchcraft in Early Modern Scotland: James' VI's Demonology and the North Berwick Witches by Lawrence Normand|Gareth Roberts (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.5/5(6). Witchcraft and Belief in Early Modern Scotland 1/11/07 AM Page i.

Book Description: This volume provides a valuable introduction to the key concepts of witchcraft and demonology through a detailed study of one of the best known and most notorious episodes of Scottish history, the North Berwick witch hunt, in which King James was involved as alleged victim, interrogator, judge and demonologist.

The cautious remarks of a great Scottish antiquary form a fitting start to a comparative tour of witchcraft beliefs in Scotland and Europe. Dalyell’s interpretative scheme is no longer viable, but in attempting to establish a more modern framework for understanding the subject, one should pay tribute to his pioneering intellectual by: 6.

This volume provides a valuable introduction to the key concepts of witchcraft and demonology through a detailed study of one of the best known and most notorious episodes of Scottish history, the North Berwick witch hunt, in which King James was involved as alleged victim, interrogator, judge and demonologist.

It provides hitherto unpublished and inaccessible [ ]. Witches in early modern Scotland. Researchers at the University of Edinburgh have identified over 3, cases of witchcraft accusation in early modern Scotland between andits peak between and when there were five large-scale witch hunts.

The belief that witches could cause harm was common among all social groups in early modern Scotland. In in Anstruther, Elizabeth Dick had been turned away from the local mill when begging.

She cursed the mill and several witnesses testified that the grain in the mill turned red. The history of witchcraft is complex, and often raises more questions than it answers.

We asked Professor Diane Purkiss to take us inside the minds of ordinary people and intellectuals in medieval and early modern England to reveal how the figure of the witch was born.

To help further our understanding and interest in this wider history of beliefs and practices, the series will include research that looks beyond the usual focus on Western Europe and that also explores their relevance and influence from the medieval to the modern period.

'A valuable series.' - Magic, Ritual and Witchcraft. Witchcraft and belief in early modern Scotland - Goodare, Julian, Martin, Lauren, Miller, Joyce, Book Enemies of God: the witch-hunt in Scotland - Larner, Christina, Book The witch-hunt in early modern Europe - Levack, Brian P., Book | – purchase recommended Witchcraft in early modern Scotland: James VI's demonology and the.

Witchcraft belief and trials in early modern European population.5 Taking into consideration that early modern Scotland book relating to the natural history of Ireland, c.p.

European population.5 Taking into consideration that early modern Scotland held roughly a quarter of the population of England, Scottish witch-hunting was twelve times more intense: of the 3, people tried for witchcraft, around two-thirds were convicted and executed.6 So if most of Europe prosecuted high numbers of witches in the early modern.

Lauren Martin is the author of The Adventures of Mina and Jack ( avg rating, 1 rating, 1 review), The Book of Moods ( avg rating, 0 ratings, 0 rev /5. Witchcraft in Early Modern Scotland: James VI's Demonology and the North Berwick Witches (Exeter, U.K.: Exeter University Press, ), 89, and Peter G.

Maxwell-Stuart Satan's, Conspiracy: Magic and Witchcraft in Sixteenth-Century Scotland (East Linton, U.K.: Tuck-Cited by:   Witchcraft and Belief in Early Modern Scotland (review) Witchcraft and Belief in Early Modern Scotland (review) Maxwell-Stuart, P.

Reviews the story. Engrossing enough to read on a summer day at the beach or in a crowded cafe, the book will greatly appeal to undergraduate and graduate students as well as to specialists interested in South Asia, gender, Islam, religion.

Sharpe, James, Instruments of Darkness: Witchcraft in Early Modern England (University of Pennsylvania Press, ). Divided into background on topics like witchcraft in elite mentalities and popular culture, a thematic middle section including ‘Women and witchcraft’, and an analysis of the decline of belief in witchcraft.

A collection of essays on Scottish witchcraft and witch-hunting, which covers the whole period of the Scottish witch-hunt, from the mid-sixteenth century to the early eighteenth. Includes studies of particular witchcraft panics such as a reassessment of the role of King James VI.

Covers a wide range of topics concerned with Scottish witch-hunting and places it in the context of other topics. Goodare et al. (eds), Witchcraft and Belief in Early Modern Scotland, pp. See also Alaric See also Alaric Hall, ‘Getting Shot of Elves: Healing, Witchcraft and Fairies in the Scottish Author: Andrew Sneddon.

His publications on witchcraft include The Witch-Hunt in Early Modern Europe (3rd edn, ) and Witch-Hunting in Scotland: Law, Politics and Religion (). He is co-author of Witchcraft and Magic in Europe: The Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries () and the editor of The Witchcraft Cited by: 1.

It’s unclear exactly when witches came on the historical scene, but one of the earliest records of a witch is in the Bible in the book of 1 Samuel. Although the Inquisition began in the late Medieval Period, it was during the Early Modern period that the witch hunt in Europe began in earnest, beginning with the early witch trails in the 15th Century.

In England, for example, the first Act of Parliament directed specifically against witchcraft was the act “De hæretico comburendo”, passed at the instigation of Archbishop Thomas Arundel.

This book provides an introduction to the key concepts of witchcraft and demonology through a detailed study of one of the best-known and most notorious episodes of Scottish history — the North Berwick witch hunt — in which King James was involved as alleged victim, interrogator, judge, and demonologist.

It provides hitherto unpublished and inaccessible material from the legal Author: Lawrence Normand. This study constitutes a wide-ranging and original overview of the place of witchcraft and witch-hunting in the broader culture of early modern England.

Based on a mass of new evidence extracted from a range of archives, both local and national, it seeks to relate the rise and decline of belief in witchcraft, alongside the legal prosecution of witches, to the wider political culture of the period. The documents collected here explore some of these aspects of magical belief and especially the anxiety and concerns centering on witches, bad magic, and witch-hunts in early modern Europe.

Scholars and commentators produced these works seeking to understand, and help combat, the spread of witchcraft or to help people recognize the folly in. Legge, F., “ Witchcraft in Scotland,” The Scottish Review, XVIII (),estimates that about witches were executed during the period There is, in fact, hard evidence for only sixty-five executions and one suicide of accused witches during the two-year period Cited by: Scottish Witchcraft Book Summary: From the ancient misty Highlands of Scotland to modern-day America come the secrets of solitary Witchcraft practice.

Scottish Witchcraft explores "PectiWita," or the craft of the Picts, the mysterious early Keltic people. The Scottish PectiWita tradition differs in many ways from the Wicca of England-there is little emphasis on the worship of the gods (though.

His publications on witchcraft include The Witch-Hunt in Early Modern Europe (3rd edn, ) and Witch-Hunting in Scotland: Law, Politics and Religion (). He is co-author of Witchcraft and Magic in Europe: The Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries () and the editor of The Witchcraft Cited by: 5.

The Scottish public is being consulted on a proposed national memorial in Fife for people condemned as witches. Scottish records inform that between the 16th and 18th centuries there were at least 1, executions of people accused of witchcraft, and witches lie at the very heart of the country’s folkloric newly proposed witch memorial will be the focus of discussions next.

The great age of witch trials, which ran between andfascinates and repels in equal measure. Over the course of a century and a half, 80, people were tried for witchcraft and half of Author: Jamie Doward.

Witch hunting became intensified in many parts of Europe during the Protestant Reformation, and especially so in Scotland. Where the Catholic Church had turned a blind eye to folk practices, and in many cases even accommodated local beliefs into Church festivals, the Protestant reformers had a zero tolerance policy toward any practice they Reviews: During the Reformation, witchcraft was a complex problem.

To understand witchcraft during this period, one needs to recognize the role religion played. Religious teachings and beliefs in early modern Europe dealt with principles pertaining to man and his relationship with : Kathy Warnes.

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